Using a Nebulizer

Posted on Jan 21, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

A nebulizer is a small machine that turns liquid medicine into a mist. You sit with the machine and breathe in through a connected mouthpiece. Medicine goes into your lungs as you take slow, deep breaths for 10 to 15 minutes. It is easy and pleasant to breathe the medicine into your lungs this way. Most nebulizers also work by using air compressors.

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Posted in Nebulizer System

All About CPAP

Posted on Mar 18, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

CPAP or continuous positive airway pressure is a airway pressure ventilator that applies air pressure continuously to keep the airways constantly open for people who are unable to breathe on their own.

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Posted in CPAP/BIPAP

Auto – Adjusting CPAP – APAP

Posted on Mar 19, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

The APAP (Automatic Positive Airway Pressure) machine is designed to automatically adjust on a breath after breath basis to blow the minimum amount of pressure that is needed to keep your airway open during sleep. This allows your device to provide ideal pressure to the airway during the night.

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Posted in Auto Adjusting CPAP

Asthma Spacers - For Effective Medication Delivery

Posted on Mar 19, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

An asthma spacer is a device used that increases the ease of administering aerosolized medication from a metered-dose inhaler (MDI). The spacer adds space in the form of a tube or a chamber between the can of medication and the patient’s mouth, thus allowing the patient to inhale the medication by breathing in slowly and deeply for five to 10 breaths.

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Posted in Asthma Inhalers and Spacers

Cleanliness and CPAP

Posted on Mar 23, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

Cleanliness is very important when it comes to using medical equipment and devices in your house. Your CPAP system also need cleaning from time to time and so special care has to be taken when cleaning one as it involves messing around with the respiratory system if anything goes wrong.

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All About Tracheostomy Tubes

Posted on Mar 23, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

The tube is an object that is placed inside the stoma and is the medium through which the air enters the trachea. There are four major parts of the tube, the outer cannula, the inner cannula, and the obturator. The obturator is used to place the outer cannula perfectly in position and then is removed carefully.

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The Magic of HME

Posted on Mar 23, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

HME or Heat Moisture Exchangers are devices that are used with tracheostomy devices and mimic the moisturizing and heating function that is usually performed by the nostrils, mouth and upper trachea. There are many different items used inside the HME that provide the moisture for example foam, paper, or any substance that can act as a surface for condensation and absorption.

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Posted in Heat/Moisture Exchanger (HME)

CPAP Humidifiers - Humidity and Pressurized Air

Posted on Mar 23, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

A CPAP Heated Humidifier is home to a water chamber, which it heats to moisturize the air provided by your machine. Together they are ideal for those who find that the machine is leaving them with a dry mouth, sore nasal passages or simply find the air cold and therefore very uncomfortable.

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Posted in CPAP Humidifiers

Measuring Asthma

Posted on Mar 23, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

Daily exposure to asthma triggers can cause airway inflammation in kids with asthma even when they're not having any specific breathing problems. Airway inflammation develops over time, and puts kids at a risk for unexpected flare-ups. They might feel okay, even as their airways are swell, become narrow, and eventually get blocked.

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Posted in Peak Flow Meters

A Buyer’s Guide For PEP Therapy Systems

Posted on Mar 25, 2016 by Taikhum Sadiq

Positive expiratory pressure therapy or the PEP therapy is an airway clearance technique for patients that have Cystic Fibrosis. A positive pressure is generated in the airways by breathing out with a moderate force through a resistance, which helps to keep them open. This positive pressure allows airflow to get under the areas of mucus obstruction and move the mucus toward the larger airways.

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